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          Diane Keaton describes herself as a “sloppy” actress.

          “I warn people before [filming] I am going to mess up,” said the Oscar-winning star.

          She’s been “sloppy” since studying at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York in the 1960s with Sanford Meisner, who emphasized a natural style. “The main thing that Sanford Meisner gave me — not really just for acting but life — is just be in the moment,” she said.

          Her latest director, Rob Reiner, appreciated the approach.

          “She told me, ‘I don’t act, I am just who I am,’” said Reiner. “She basically takes the dialogue and makes it her own. Her instincts are just so good — it creates no false moments.”

          READ THE FULL INTERVIEW

          hould he ever seek a career change, Michael Douglas could well be the next Barbara Walters, or at the very least, occupy a seat on The View.

          Give him two minutes with Diane Keaton, and he dispels with the niceties. Douglas cuts right to the chase after she expounds on how thrilled she is to be back in Manhattan, albeit for only 24 hours for work after living here for 20 years at the start of her career.

          “Who were you living with? Come on,” probes Douglas, 69, without missing a beat.

          “I had an analyst here. Sometimes I had someone I was affectionate with,” demurs Keaton, 68.

          “Was it Al? Was Al here?” barrels on Douglas, referring to Keaton’s old squeeze, Michael Corleone himself.

          Keaton appears both amused, and flustered. “Al was here. Thank you. Thank you for that,” she says, looking away from Douglas. “He’s very good at this.”

          READ THE FULL INTERVIEW

          Some new event photos in the Delightful Diane Keaton gallery from the “And So It Goes” East Hampton Premiere.


          Delightful Diane Keaton Gallery > Events > 2014 > “AND SO IT GOES” EAST HAMPTON PREMIERE

          ou write, “These old-as-dirt days have one advantage: I’ve learned to see beauty where I never saw it before.” What do you mean? “When I was young, I wanted my appearance to be more interesting than what surrounded me. Now the body part I like best is my eyes, because they bring beauty to me.”

          How so? “You have the opportunity to see out. That’s the change. It’s about the transformation from one way of living to another. As you move along, you don’t want to be stuck with the same set of concerns. There are so many aspects of the new that are engaging—don’t be afraid of it. Why is the old so great? I don’t think it is. Let’s move along. It keeps you curious and alive and filled with appreciation.”

          You also say your ideas about bodies have changed as you’ve gotten older. How? “It took me a while to fall in love with the female form. When I was young, I was more taken with the Twiggys of the world, women who were boyish. Now I have a daughter who is shapely, and I think that has helped change my view.”

          Have your rules about what you will wear changed as you’ve gotten older? “I am never going to wear anything sleeveless, ever, ever, ever. But I’ve always loved suits and jackets. I think there should be a chain of stores that make men’s clothing fitted to women’s bodies—called Ellen’s Crossing or something.”

          READ THE FULL INTERVIEW


          Your book touches on romances with Woody Allen, Warren Beatty, Al Pacino, and Jack Nicholson.
          Many of my relationships have been fantasy-based. My concept of love wasn’t very real. I’ve made a friend out of Jack, which was never my intention when I first met him. My intention was he should be fascinated with me and want to date me. My future is to become more a friend than any kind of lover.

          You mention admiring Joan Rivers. Why?
          I’ve never seen anybody more hardworking and ambitious.

          Yet she and others have been hard on your fashion choices.
          Judging outfits is a great opportunity to trash something but still love it. I never exactly understood what I was supposed to do on red carpets.

          What are your thoughts on aging?
          There’s beauty in being older. You pick up things you never noticed before. I always was a slow developer, you know?

          SOURCE


          Delightful Diane Keaton Gallery > Magazine Scans > MORE MAGAZINE MAY 2014

          Thanks to Kimbr we’ve got all the scans of Diane in People’s Magazine Most Beautiful People issue.


          Delightful Diane Keaton Gallery > Magazine Scans > PEOPLE MAGAZINE APRIL 2014

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